Fix Your Chest Press and Rows with Chinese Plank Variations

Fix Your Chest Press and Rows with Chinese Plank Variations

Dr. Joel Seedman, Ph.D.


I’m a huge fan of modifying foundational movement patterns by performing variations that literally force the lifter to use proper body mechanics.  These Chinese plank variations do just that.  Shoutout to awesome physical therapist Dominic Labelle for highlighting the standard Chinese plank recently in his social media posts.  If you don’t already follow Dominic I highly recommend putting him on your list as he always provides very educational and informative content.


Chinese Plank With Chest Presses

Performing chest presses in conjunction with the Chinese plank does wonders not only for recruiting the entire posterior chain, but it literally forces the lifter to assume optimal postural alignment throughout their entire spine.  In fact if you have difficulty producing enough retraction and t-spine extension on chest presses or engaging your upper back you’ll want to incorporate these Chinese plank chest presses into your routine.  You can also perform them in a head-off position as shown here which further instills proper postural alignment by allowing the cervical spine to elongate rather than being compressed against the bench.  This produces ideal mechanics in the glenohumeral joint as the lifter can more easily pack and centrate the shoulders into their appropriate position due to a lengthened and rigid spinal alignment.   

The ability to dorsiflex the feet and ankles during a chest press also promotes enhanced spinal rigidity and improved shoulder mechanics.  There are several reasons for this.  First, aggressive dorsiflexion of the ankles and feet helps to produce greater concurrent activation potentiation and irradiation and ultimately increased neural drive up the kinetic chain (greater activation to all muscles including the working extremities).  The dorsiflexed ankle position also helps place a slight stretch (while simultaneously under tension) to the hamstrings and glutes thereby promoting improved spinal rigidity, which contributes to better thoracic positioning.  Simply put it facilitates a more lengthened spinal position, improved postural alignment, and greater upper back activation.  This helps to reinforce proper shoulder mechanics as the lifter will find it more natural to fire the lats and centrate the glenohumeral joint.  So yes, dorsiflexing the ankles actually translates to improved shoulder function and upper body mechanics.  To ensure excessive lumbar extension does not occur focus on keeping your stomach pulled in as you contract your posterior chain and extend your hips.

Finally, the Chinese plank chest press may look vaguely familiar to many reading this as it holds many similarities to the T-bench chest press I frequently advocate.  The main difference is the lifter is holding a straight leg glute bridge rather than a 90 degree bent leg bridge.  The T-bench chest press with the bent leg bridge (although one of my favorite variations) can periodically promote excessive lumbar extension as the hips can over-extend.  This Chinese plank chest press variation with the legs kept straight makes it nearly impossible to overextend the body particularly when the ankle dorsiflexion and straight leg position cues are employed together.

Oh and in case you were wondering, yes you can do these single leg, but just be ready for some serious cramping in your backside.


Chinese Plank With Barbell Rows

Now that we’ve covered the posterior chain of the lower body and the pressing muscles of the upper body lets move onto the reciprocal muscle groups.  In this Chinese plank variation you’re essentially holding an armless plank while performing barbell rows.  In contrast to the chest press variation, which targets the glutes, hamstrings, and erectors, this one targets the hip flexors, quads, and anterior core. 

Oh wait, did I forget to mention how I’ve been recently highlighting the importance of firing the hip flexors and quads on planks, pushups, and ab rollout variations (or anything that is an ant-extension movement) and not the hip extensors/glutes??? Yeah, well these Chinese plank examples should pretty much put this topic to rest once and for all. 

In essence, if the prime movers needed to hold a glute bridge or supine bridge are the glutes, hamstrings and low back musculature (which no one would deny), then performing the opposite motion/position namely a front plank which is essentially a front bridge requires the exact opposite muscles to fire namely the hip flexors, quads and core.  And just as you would never intentionally contract the hip flexors while performing a glute bridge or anti-flexion position, you would never want to consciously contract the hip extensors when holding a plank or anti-extension position. 

And no this is not excessive extension you see in this video.  What you’re seeing is a neutral spine that’s maintaining its natural lordotic curvature, which is something the world's foremost expert on spinal health Dr. Stuart McGill discusses extensively in his research.  You don’t want to eliminate that natural curvature; instead you want to maintain it. 

And yes I have fairly large glutes, which makes the low back look more arched than what it is.  The key is to look at the position of my hips and pelvis in relation to the rest of my torso and body.  It’s all one straight line.  I’m not talking about drawing a line from the top of my butt to the other segments of my body as the glutes are a muscle and you never want to line up muscles with joints when analyzing joint segments and biomechanics.  Instead examine the joints beginning with my ankles, then knees, then hips (center of the hips at the joint not the muscle), then the spine, shoulders, and neck and they all follow the exact same line indicating proper joint stacking and spinal alignment.  The hips are not in back or in front of the spine or other joint segments therefore we know the pelvis is in the proper position as the spine is simply maintaining it’s natural position, which includes a neutrally arched alignment.

On a final side note, this Chinese plank barbell row is not a rowing variation that you would use to perform heavy loading.  Instead it should be employed to help dial in form and lock in your body mechanics.  In addition, the standard prone row performed laying on a bench can often cause excessive lumbar arch to occur as the individual can essentially over-bow their torso and spine.  This is often a byproduct of compensating by using lumbar extension to help drive the weight up rather than relying solely on the upper back and thoracic extension.  With the Chinese plank variation because there’s nothing under the mid torso helping to support the hips and core, it forces the lifter to fire their anterior core and minimize excessive lumbar extension that can commonly occur on prone or seal rows.  In fact if you don’t fire your core like mad, your hips and low back will literally shoot towards the ground making it impossible to perform this movement.


Additional Variations

If you're looking for a unique and brutal way to crush nearly every muscle in your body from head to toe, try this Chinese plank pullover performed in an eccentric isometric fashion as demonstrated by one of my awesome clients Matt Jordan. It's also does wonders for improving poster. And yes posture is very important regardless of what the latest so called "pain experts"/charlatans might claim. Performing these with kettlebells increases the difficulty due to the hanging nature of the load particularly in the stretched position.  The Chinese plank position can be used for a variety of exercise including chest presses, pullovers, skull crushers, chest flyes, and more.   

It also does wonders for improving poster. And yes posture is very important regardless of what the latest so called "pain experts"/charlatans might claim. Performing these with kettlebells increases the difficulty due to the hanging nature of the load particularly in the stretched position.  The Chinese plank position can be used for a variety of exercise including chest presses, pullovers, skull crushers, chest flyes, and more.   

Find out more about how to program this and other similar exercises into your routine Here.